Standing with Women and Girls to End AIDS

By Sarah Konopka

Sarah Konopka, MA, is Principal Technical Advisor for HIV & AIDS Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH) Global HIV & AIDS Program. Follow Sarah on Twitter . This article originally appeared on MSH’s Global Health Impact blog. 

Photo Credit: Mark Tuschman

There was an awkward silence and then soft giggling as the girls looked at each other. I had just finished talking about strategies for persuading sexual partners to use a condom. Laughter during these skills-building and girls empowerment sessions with 30+ secondary school students in Morogoro, Tanzania was not uncommon, particularly given the sometimes sensitive topics of discussion, but this time, the joke was lost on me. Continue reading “Standing with Women and Girls to End AIDS”

« J’ai retrouvé ma personnalité et ma dignité ».

Photo: Adama Sanogo/MSH

For English, click here.

Le programme FCI de Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Sciences de la santé pour la santé, avec le soutien du Sous-cluster humanitaire SGBV (financé par UNFPA), travaille avec des points focaux villageois formés pour référer les survivants de les survivants de la violence basée sur le genre (VBG) 59 villages vers des services médicaux et psychosociaux gratuits dans 9 hôpitaux et pharmacies de Mopti. Une cliente de 15 ans et une survivante de viol familial racontent son histoire. Continue reading “« J’ai retrouvé ma personnalité et ma dignité ».”

“I got my dignity back.”

Photo: Adama Sanogo/MSH

Pour le français, cliquez ici.

The FCI Program of Management  Sciences for Health, with support from the SGBV Humanitarian Subcluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies in Mopti. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. Continue reading ““I got my dignity back.””

Ending gender-based violence and FGM in Mali, village by village

Martha Murdock is Technical Strategy Lead for regional programs at the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health.

Communities in the Mopti region of central Mali—which is home to several ethnic groups and to many people displaced by 2012 violence in the country’s northern region—continue to grapple with widespread sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), including forced and early marriage and other harmful practices. A majority of Malian girls are married by the time they reach 18, and 15% before the age of 15.  About 91% of women between 15 and 49 years old, as well as 69% of girls under 15, have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM). And, as is true in so many conflict-affected areas, widespread sexual violence has been a tragic and infuriating effect of war, dislocation, and migration.

After many years of work in Mali, both in the Mopti region and nationally, the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health is committed both to reducing the incidence of SGBV and to mitigating its devastating effects on survivors. Because harmful practices are deeply rooted in the region’s cultural, religious, economic, and social heritage, ending them requires strong and concerted community engagement and action. But the impact of this work could not be any more powerful, as we learn again and again from the women whose strength, resolve, and resilience continue to inspire us.

An SGBV survivor arriving for medical and psychosocial care
Photo: Adama Sanogo/ Management Sciences for Health

Continue reading “Ending gender-based violence and FGM in Mali, village by village”

Scenes from Midwifery Training: Helping Mothers Survive

By Nongma Sawadogo and Alanna Savage

Nongma Sawadogo leads work on women’s and children’s health for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in Burkina Faso, and Alanna Savage is senior communications specialist for the FCI Program of MSH. 

Burkina Faso has unacceptably high national rates of maternal and newborn mortality, but health indicators are the poorest in the Sahel, North and East where many more women and children are dying from preventable causes due to poor quality of care.

With support from Johnson & Johnson and working closely with the Division of Family Health, the Ministry of Health, UNFPA, the School of Public Health and national midwifery associations, the FCI Program of MSH is leading an intensive training, supervision and mentorship program to improve midwives’ mastery of life-saving clinical skills. The training program covers three modules: (1) compassionate care for mothers and newborns, (2) Helping Mothers Survive, and (3) Helping Babies Breathe.

Continue reading “Scenes from Midwifery Training: Helping Mothers Survive”

A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care

This story originally appeared on the Management Sciences for Health website.

When her rapist was arrested, 16-year old Brigitte* thought the worst was behind her. But when she discovered she was pregnant, she had little choice but to drop out of school and work the family fields in her village, in the Manika health zone of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). She certainly could not afford antenatal care (ANC) visits.

The DRC government has made maternal health one of its highest priorities, and partners like the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) have collaborated with the Ministry of Health to make that vision a reality. Knowing that ANC visits are out-of-reach for many women, IHPplus subsidizes free and reduced-cost care for expectant mothers. And knowing that many women are not aware of the benefits of ANC visits, IHPplus has organized a variety of campaigns to educate mothers-to-be. Continue reading “A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care”

Top tips for advocates working on emergency contraception

By Melissa Garcia and Cristina Puig Borrás

Melissa Garcia is Technical Adviser for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception (ICEC), hosted by MSH. Cristina Puig Borrás is the Coordinator for the European Consortium for Emergency Contraception. This article orginally appeared on ICEC’s website

Photo: Susana Galdos/MSH

With the current largest generation of young people, there is much to celebrate on August 12, International Youth Day. In particular, there is the growing recognition that as agents of change, adolescents and young people and their organisations are essential stakeholders who contribute to inclusive, just, sustainable and peaceful societies. Crucially, advocates working on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and reproductive rights (RR) advance access for young people in meaningful ways. Continue reading “Top tips for advocates working on emergency contraception”

Pour la première fois, les communes de la région Sahel au Burkina Faso, adoptent et ajoutent la planification familiale à leurs budgets

Par Nongma Sawadogo

Nongma Sawadogo dirige le travail sur la santé des femmes et des enfants pour le programme FCI de Management Sciences for Health (MSH) au Burkina Faso. Cet article est apparu sur le blog K4Health.

Un kiosque de planification familiale au salon de la santé au Burkina Faso. © 2011 Centre pour les programmes de communication, avec la permission de Photoshare

Quand j’étais en formation pour devenir sage-femme, une hôtesse de l’air,  sans argent et dans un  état critique, se présentait  à la maternité de l’hôpital  Yalgado Ouédraogo de Ouagadougou, après avoir eu recours à un avortement raté.  Mes collègues et moi avons cotisé de l’argent afin de lui procurer  ses médicaments essentiels, mais malheureusement elle a succombé à ses saignements (hémorragie)- malgré le fait que nous lui avons administré ses médicaments.

Nous étions choqués. Et je pensais que  nous devons absolument faire quelque chose pour améliorer la santé reproductive des femmes. Quand je pense que cette femme aurait pu être sauvée si seulement elle avait eu accès à la planification familiale. Cela m’a rappelé la raison pour laquelle  je voulais devenir sage-femme (maïeuticien)  – pour sauver des êtres humains.

Cependant,  la planification familiale ne commence pas avec les sages-femmes ou les médecins. En effet, elle commence avec les décideurs politiques et un budget adéquat alloué à cette fin. La planification familiale débute par une forte  volonté politique et de l’argent. Les dirigeants peuvent s’inspirer pour améliorer  l’accès aux services de contraception et de santé reproductive, mais ils doivent aussi  impérativement prouver cet engagement en les incluant parmi les éléments principaux de leurs budgets locaux et  explicitement sur le plan auquel le gouvernement  local envisage l’usage des fonds publics. Continue reading “Pour la première fois, les communes de la région Sahel au Burkina Faso, adoptent et ajoutent la planification familiale à leurs budgets”

For the first time, communes in Burkina Faso’s Sahel region add family planning to their budgets

By Nongma Sawadogo

Version française

Nongma Sawadogo leads work on women’s and children’s health for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in Burkina Faso. This article originally appeared on the K4Health Blog.  

A family planning booth at a health fair in Burkina Faso. Photo: Center for Communication Programs, Courtesy of Photoshare

When I was in training to become a midwife, a flight attendant, with no money and in critical condition, arrived at the maternity ward of Yalgado Ouédraogo hospital in Ouagadougou after getting a botched abortion. My colleagues and I put money together to buy her essential medicines, but she eventually died–even after we administered the medicines. We were shocked. And I thought, we must do something to improve women’s reproductive health. When I think that this woman could have been saved if she’d had access to family planning earlier, I’m reminded of my reason for becoming a midwife–to save human beings.

But family planning doesn’t start with midwives or doctors. It starts with political will and with money. If political leaders want to  improve women’s access to contraception and reproductive health services in their communities, they can act on this commitment by making a line item for these services in their local budgets, the local government’s plan for how it will spend public money. Continue reading “For the first time, communes in Burkina Faso’s Sahel region add family planning to their budgets”

An ounce of (after-sex) prevention: At the Family Planning Summit, let’s talk about emergency contraception

By Elizabeth Westley

Elizabeth Westley is the director of the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, where this article first appeared. 

To meet the global Family Planning 2020 goals, a full range of family planning methods must be available, including user-controlled, short-acting methods. The Guttmacher Institute’s analysis , Adding it Up, estimates that 214 million women of reproductive age in developing regions want to avoid pregnancy but are not using a modern contraceptive method.  Half of unmarried women with an unmet need for family planning report infrequent sex as the reason that they do not use a family planning method. A quarter of married women not using contraception fall into the same category.  Not feeling themselves at high levels of risk, these women may wish to avoid the appointments and waiting times, dependence on providers, side effects, discomforts, and other commitments that long-acting contraceptive methods sometimes entail. Other women may not be using modern contraception because they are unaware of their options or are faced with inaccessibility due to distance barriers, poor health infrastructures, stock outs, or high prices. As well, many women are located in humanitarian and fragile settings where contraceptive access can be challenging.  For many women and girls not currently using a long-acting contraceptive method, a simple, discreet, user-controlled, low-commitment, one-time “on demand” form of contraception that can be accessed easily and quickly is a critically important option. This method already exists: emergency contraception. Continue reading “An ounce of (after-sex) prevention: At the Family Planning Summit, let’s talk about emergency contraception”