Perspectives on Monitoring Progress Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality: Highlights from CUGH 2017

By: Meg O’Connor, Project Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog.

Photo: MHTF

Earlier this month, global health experts (and students aspiring to be experts) from around the world gathered for a series of presentations, panels and posters at the 2017 Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) Conference in Washington, D.C. The panel titled “Perspectives on Monitoring Progress Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality: What Measures Matter?” provided an opportunity to discuss the monitoring framework developed to accompany the Strategies toward ending preventable maternal mortality (EPMM) report released in 2015. The panel was moderated by Mary Ellen Stanton, Senior Maternal Health Advisor at USAID, and included Rima Jolivet, Maternal Health Technical Director of the Maternal Health Task Force, Elahi Chowdhury of icddr,b (Bangaldesh) and Chibugo Okoli of the Maternal Child Survival Program (MCSP, Nigeria). Representing maternal health monitoring at the global, national and facility-levels respectively, the panelists provided insights from their unique perspectives and highlighted the importance of the EPMM monitoring framework. Continue reading “Perspectives on Monitoring Progress Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality: Highlights from CUGH 2017”

Healthy Women, Healthy Nations

By Fatimata Kané

Fatimata Kané is Project Director of the FCI Program of MSH in Mali. This article originally appeared on the MSH Health Impact Blog. Read this article in French

Photo: Catherine Lalonde

Putting a child on the earth is a whole different type of work. Not everyone can guide a woman and her baby safely through pregnancy and childbirth.

I know what it means to keep women and babies alive and healthy because I am a midwife. Continue reading “Healthy Women, Healthy Nations”

Femmes saines, nations en santé

Par Fatimata Kané

Fatimata Kané est directrice  du programme FCI de MSH au Mali.

Photo: Catherine Lalonde

Mettre un enfant au monde est tout un travail différent. Tout le monde peut aider quelqu’un qui est malade, mais tout le monde ne peut pas faire le travail d’une sage-femme–guider une femme et son bébé en toute sécurité pendant la grossesse et l’accouchement. Je sais ce que signifie garder les femmes et les bébés vivants et en bonne santé parce que je suis une sage-femme. Continue reading “Femmes saines, nations en santé”

Beyond reproductive and maternal health: Non-communicable diseases and women’s health

On March 15, 2017, Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, Women Deliver, Novo Nordisk, and the NCD Alliance, of which MSH is a steering committee member, hosted a panel discussion during the Commission on the Status of Women to call for the integration of the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) into the reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health continuum of care. The following post summarizes the key messages from the side event and offers recommendations for further action.

Photo by Kristina Sperkova (via Twitter)

Women are essential to a vibrant, healthy economy. Women are producers, caretakers, and consumers–and when they are oppressed and devalued, the economy stalls. Women’s full participation in the workforce is contingent on their ability to realize their fundamental human rights, including the right to health. Continue reading “Beyond reproductive and maternal health: Non-communicable diseases and women’s health”

Global and national maternal mortality targets for the Sustainable Development Goals

By: Rima Jolivet, Maternal Health Technical Director, Maternal Health Task Force; Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

This post originally appeared on the MHTF Blog.

There has been some confusion recently about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) target for reducing global maternal mortality. The SDG global target is to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio (MMR) to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030. In addition to this global target, there are separate country-level targets: The primary national target is that by 2030, every country should reduce its MMR by at least two-thirds from its 2010 baseline. The secondary target, which applies to countries with the highest maternal mortality burdens, is that no country should have an MMR greater than 140 deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030.

Continue reading “Global and national maternal mortality targets for the Sustainable Development Goals”

Universal health coverage and gender

By Stacy Lu

This interview with Kiley Workman Diop originally appeared on the blog for Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS), a program funded by USAID and implemented by Management Sciences for Health. This interview has been edited for length. 

Kiley Workman Diop is a Technical Advisor for SIAPS, and Stacy Lu is a Technical Writer for SIAPS.

A pharmacist with a client at the pharmacy for the the Hospital Notre Dame des Palmistes, Ile la Tortue, Haiti  (Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin)

How does attention to gender figure into the work SIAPS does in strengthening pharmaceutical systems?
In public health, when you’re designing an intervention you’re trying to think broadly about what’s going to help the whole population. But you also need to pay special attention to vulnerable groups, including groups that derive their vulnerability from their gender. In a broad sense, it’s about equity—if half the population (whether men or women, boys or girls) isn’t being served appropriately by our interventions, that dilutes SIAPS’s success and we miss out on achieving equitable access to medicines and services that help save lives. We have to think about gender to ensure equitable access to quality care.

Continue reading “Universal health coverage and gender”

PROGRES requires a keen gender perspective

By Alanna Savage and Andrew Gaydos

Alanna Savage is a Senior Communications Specialist for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Andrew Gaydos is a Project Support Associate at MSH.

In our ambitious vision to reach all people, everywhere, it is ever more necessary to examine the varying life experiences–the actual realities–of the people whose health we work to improve. Part of this examination requires a critical look at how gender plays out in the power structures of society, the daily lives of people, and more concretely, in the “who, what, where, when, and how” of health-seeking behavior and access to essential reproductive and maternal health care.

Maternal mortality in Mali remains high–587 women die for every 100,000 live births–but only 28 percent of sexually active women of reproductive have satisfied their demand for family planning.  Women and girls continue to confront widespread sexual and gender-based violence, including female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); in 2015, about 126,000 women and girls received prevention services, protection, and care related to FGM/C. And thanks to the work of the FCI Program of MSH, traditional and faith leaders are advocating for family planning and coming together to provide support to survivors of gender-based violence and to identify early warning signs of imminent violence.

Gender inequality undoubtedly plays a role in high maternal mortality and unmet need for family planning and the continuance of sexual and gender-based violence. As long as women and girls must continue to fight for equal voice and an equal share of opportunity and power, their lives and health will remain under threat. Gender influences health outcomes, access to care, providers’ treatment of patients, relationships among health workers and supervisors, and health career barriers and opportunities.

Photo by Catherine Lalonde

Continue reading “PROGRES requires a keen gender perspective”

We are fearless. #FearlessFeb

Photo by Joey O’Loughlin

We are celebrating Fearless February to rally the global community around advocacy for reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health!

This month, the FCI Program of MSH will feature stories about fearless champions, powerful evidence, and advocacy wins from the Rights & Realities archive. Follow #FearlessFeb on Twitter and Facebook to read the story of the day.

Join us on Twitter and Facebook, and tell us:
What makes you fearless? What does “fearless” mean to you?
Subscribe to Rights & Realities (on the homepage, right column) to receive emails of new posts.

 

Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor is Vice President for health programs at Management Sciences for Health. This post originally appeared on STAT News

Midwifery students in Sierra Leone, which has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. Funding for safe pregnancy and delivery worldwide is threatened by President Trump’s reinstatement of the global gag rule. (Photo by MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump’s reinstatement of the Mexico City Policy, better known as the global gag rule, came as no surprise to anyone working in the field of global health. We have been through this before — in 1984, when the policy was first put into effect by President Reagan, and then in 1993, 2001, and 2009, when it was repealed, reinstated, and repealed again.

The Mexico City Policy is called a gag rule because it limits not just what organizations and health providers do but what they are permitted to say. It prevents foreign organizations that receive US government funding from performing abortions — even if they are using funds from non-US government sources and even if abortion is completely legal in their countries.

The global gag rule also steps right between a woman and her doctor, nurse, or midwife, preventing these frontline health providers from telling their patients about the full, legal range of health options available to them. It forbids trusted advisers from giving honest, comprehensive health advice and information. I started my career as a nurse-midwife, and then worked in maternal and newborn health programs in Africa and Asia, so I know what this will mean for the lives and health of women and their families. Continue reading “Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients”