Healthy Women, Healthy Nations

By Fatimata Kané

Fatimata Kané is Project Director of the FCI Program of MSH in Mali. This article originally appeared on the MSH Health Impact Blog. Read this article in French

Photo: Catherine Lalonde

Putting a child on the earth is a whole different type of work. Not everyone can guide a woman and her baby safely through pregnancy and childbirth.

I know what it means to keep women and babies alive and healthy because I am a midwife. Continue reading “Healthy Women, Healthy Nations”

Femmes saines, nations en santé

Par Fatimata Kané

Fatimata Kané est directrice  du programme FCI de MSH au Mali.

Photo: Catherine Lalonde

Mettre un enfant au monde est tout un travail différent. Tout le monde peut aider quelqu’un qui est malade, mais tout le monde ne peut pas faire le travail d’une sage-femme–guider une femme et son bébé en toute sécurité pendant la grossesse et l’accouchement. Je sais ce que signifie garder les femmes et les bébés vivants et en bonne santé parce que je suis une sage-femme. Continue reading “Femmes saines, nations en santé”

PROGRES requires a keen gender perspective

By Alanna Savage and Andrew Gaydos

Alanna Savage is a Senior Communications Specialist for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Andrew Gaydos is a Project Support Associate at MSH.

In our ambitious vision to reach all people, everywhere, it is ever more necessary to examine the varying life experiences–the actual realities–of the people whose health we work to improve. Part of this examination requires a critical look at how gender plays out in the power structures of society, the daily lives of people, and more concretely, in the “who, what, where, when, and how” of health-seeking behavior and access to essential reproductive and maternal health care.

Maternal mortality in Mali remains high–587 women die for every 100,000 live births–but only 28 percent of sexually active women of reproductive have satisfied their demand for family planning.  Women and girls continue to confront widespread sexual and gender-based violence, including female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); in 2015, about 126,000 women and girls received prevention services, protection, and care related to FGM/C. And thanks to the work of the FCI Program of MSH, traditional and faith leaders are advocating for family planning and coming together to provide support to survivors of gender-based violence and to identify early warning signs of imminent violence.

Gender inequality undoubtedly plays a role in high maternal mortality and unmet need for family planning and the continuance of sexual and gender-based violence. As long as women and girls must continue to fight for equal voice and an equal share of opportunity and power, their lives and health will remain under threat. Gender influences health outcomes, access to care, providers’ treatment of patients, relationships among health workers and supervisors, and health career barriers and opportunities.

Photo by Catherine Lalonde

Continue reading “PROGRES requires a keen gender perspective”

Emergency contraception is a simple part of post-rape care: Why is it not routinely provided?

By Melissa Garcia and Sarah Rich

Melissa Garcia is Senior Technical Officer for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception and Sarah Rich is Senior Program Officer at Women’s Refugee Commission. This post originally appeared on the blog for the Sexual Violence Research Initiative

Emergency contraception (EC) can reduce the risk of pregnancy after unprotected sex, including in cases of sexual violence. Global guidance is clear that EC should be offered to women and girls within 120 hours of sexual violence to prevent the traumatic consequences of pregnancy resulting from rape.

Yet women and girls who have experienced unprotected sex, including through sexual violence, do not routinely have access to EC. The global aid communities must work together to increase access to EC for sexual violence survivors around the world, including for women and girls who are the most marginalized, like those living in crisis-affected settings. A range of strategies can be implemented to improve access to EC. Further research is also needed to identify, evaluate, and invest in new and innovative solutions. Continue reading “Emergency contraception is a simple part of post-rape care: Why is it not routinely provided?”

Uniting the Community to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence in Mali

Martha Murdock is Technical Strategy Lead for regional programs at the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health. This post originally appeared on MSH’s Global Health Impact Blog

As a part of the international “16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence” campaign for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls, MSH is sharing its experience working to eradicate gender-based violence.

Photo credit: Adama Sanogo/MSH
Photo credit: Adama Sanogo/MSH

“We remember the hard times the women and girls of Douentza have experienced,” said Animata Bassama, a representative of the women of Douentza, referring to the fighting and ensuing gender-based violence (GBV) that plagued Mali in 2012.

Animata spoke to a crowd of 100 government officials, NGO representatives, health and finance officials, women’s advocates, and community members. A new center for GBV survivors, fortified by concrete and adorned in yellow and pink, was her backdrop. Continue reading “Uniting the Community to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence in Mali”

WE DECIDE: Young persons with disabilities call for equal rights and a life free of violence

Ariadna Capasso is Senior Technical Advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health.

Violence against women, including forced or coerced sex, is an epidemic that persists all over the world. But women with disabilities, often marginalized and denied their sexual and reproductive health rights, are particularly vulnerable to such abuse.

In June, UNFPA launched WE DECIDE, a global initiative to promote gender equality and social inclusion of young persons with disabilities and advocate for the end of sexual violence. The FCI Program of MSH worked with UNFPA and a broad range of partners in the field of disabilities to build consensus for the framework of the four-year initiative and to develop communications materials for the initiative, including a video and an infographic that conveys key messages and data on the status of persons with disabilities and gender-based violence.

Photo by the Spanish Cooperation (AECID)
An expert and advocate for persons with disabilities attends a strategy meeting to discuss the new WE DECIDE initiative. Photo by the Spanish Cooperation (AECID)

Continue reading “WE DECIDE: Young persons with disabilities call for equal rights and a life free of violence”

Preventing pregnancy after sexual assault: Do women and girls have access to emergency contraception?

Sarah Rich is Senior Technical Advisor at the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, hosted by Management Sciences for Health.

Mapingure was raped and sought EC at a hospital. The provider told her that she needed a police report. But by the time she came back… she was told it was too late to assist her. She became pregnant as a result of the rape.

–Zimbabwe case from 2014, presented by Godfrey Dalitso Kangaude in “Country overviews of legal grounds/policies related to health, rape, and safe abortion,” April 2016

Emergency contraception (EC) can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, including in cases of rape. Global guidance on EC access for sexual assault survivors is clear: EC should be offered to women and girls within 120 hours of the assault to prevent the traumatic consequences of pregnancy resulting from rape. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) clinical and policy guidelines for sexual assault and clinical handbook  include strong recommendations to provide EC as part of comprehensive, woman-centered care. Continue reading “Preventing pregnancy after sexual assault: Do women and girls have access to emergency contraception?”

A new chapter for FCI’s lifesaving mission!

Amy Boldosser-Boesch is the Senior Technical Director for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH). To receive updates in your inbox from the FCI Program and other MSH programs, please subscribe here.

Photo: Catherine Lalonde
Photo: Catherine Lalonde

A lot has happened since we first announced, a couple of months ago, the exciting news that a new chapter has begun for FCI’s mission to save women’s lives!

Now a part of Management Sciences for Health, the FCI Program of MSH has hit the ground running. Continue reading “A new chapter for FCI’s lifesaving mission!”

Addressing youth and disability: Policies of social inclusion, gender equality, non-discrimination and prevention of sexual violence

By Ariadna Capasso and Maria Faget

Ariadna Capasso is senior program officer for the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) program, and Maria Faget is LAC regional adviser on youth and adolescents.

The rights and needs of persons with disabilities are too often neglected, violated or ignored. This is manifested in acts of discrimination, emotional abuse, and physical and sexual violence, especially among adolescent women. Fifteen percent of people—close to 1 billion–around the world live with a disability, and 80% of them live in developing countries. Many women with disabilities, including adolescents, face unacceptable discrimination. Around 68% of women with a psychosocial disability will suffer sexual abuse before they turn 18. Women with disabilities often see their right to make decisions in regards to their fertility and motherhood curtailed, through practices such as forced sterilization and limited access to family planning methods. These practices are often the result of generalized stereotypes and lack of cultural sensitivity towards disabilities.

Centro de Formación, AECID (Spanish Cooperation)
Centro de Formación, AECID (Spanish Cooperation)

Continue reading “Addressing youth and disability: Policies of social inclusion, gender equality, non-discrimination and prevention of sexual violence”

Breaking the silence on gender-based violence in Mali

Adama Sanogo is Program Officer at Family Care International in Mali, working at the national office in Bamako and supervising FCI’s programs in Mopti. Adama authored a post on gender-based violence last year. 

Lire la version française ci-dessous.

Samira [not her real name], a married Burkinabe woman, took a vacation to Mali to visit her sister. One evening, they attended the Balani Show, a cultural festival of traditional music and dance, in Mopti. Samira’s sister decided to go home early, but Samira opted to stay out a little later. Later that evening, Samira walked back to her sister’s house alone when a group of young men—residents in her sister’s neighborhood—attacked and gang-raped her. The next morning, Samira contacted Family Care International for care and took her case to the police. Her attackers and their families immediately began to pressure her to drop the case. As the social intimidation mounted, even Samira’s own sister, afraid of conflict with her neighbors, advised Samira to stop pursuing the case. Despite encouragement from social workers and legal counsel provided by Family Care International (FCI), Samira eventually abandoned the case against her rapists. Although Samira wasn’t able to pursue justice, she found support, and allies, at FCI.

Continue reading “Breaking the silence on gender-based violence in Mali”