Pour la première fois, les communes de la région Sahel au Burkina Faso, adoptent et ajoutent la planification familiale à leurs budgets

Par Nongma Sawadogo

Nongma Sawadogo dirige le travail sur la santé des femmes et des enfants pour le programme FCI de Management Sciences for Health (MSH) au Burkina Faso. Cet article est apparu sur le blog K4Health.

Un kiosque de planification familiale au salon de la santé au Burkina Faso. © 2011 Centre pour les programmes de communication, avec la permission de Photoshare

Quand j’étais en formation pour devenir sage-femme, une hôtesse de l’air,  sans argent et dans un  état critique, se présentait  à la maternité de l’hôpital  Yalgado Ouédraogo de Ouagadougou, après avoir eu recours à un avortement raté.  Mes collègues et moi avons cotisé de l’argent afin de lui procurer  ses médicaments essentiels, mais malheureusement elle a succombé à ses saignements (hémorragie)- malgré le fait que nous lui avons administré ses médicaments.

Nous étions choqués. Et je pensais que  nous devons absolument faire quelque chose pour améliorer la santé reproductive des femmes. Quand je pense que cette femme aurait pu être sauvée si seulement elle avait eu accès à la planification familiale. Cela m’a rappelé la raison pour laquelle  je voulais devenir sage-femme (maïeuticien)  – pour sauver des êtres humains.

Cependant,  la planification familiale ne commence pas avec les sages-femmes ou les médecins. En effet, elle commence avec les décideurs politiques et un budget adéquat alloué à cette fin. La planification familiale débute par une forte  volonté politique et de l’argent. Les dirigeants peuvent s’inspirer pour améliorer  l’accès aux services de contraception et de santé reproductive, mais ils doivent aussi  impérativement prouver cet engagement en les incluant parmi les éléments principaux de leurs budgets locaux et  explicitement sur le plan auquel le gouvernement  local envisage l’usage des fonds publics. Continue reading “Pour la première fois, les communes de la région Sahel au Burkina Faso, adoptent et ajoutent la planification familiale à leurs budgets”

For the first time, communes in Burkina Faso’s Sahel region add family planning to their budgets

By Nongma Sawadogo

Version française

Nongma Sawadogo leads work on women’s and children’s health for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in Burkina Faso. This article originally appeared on the K4Health Blog.  

A family planning booth at a health fair in Burkina Faso. Photo: Center for Communication Programs, Courtesy of Photoshare

When I was in training to become a midwife, a flight attendant, with no money and in critical condition, arrived at the maternity ward of Yalgado Ouédraogo hospital in Ouagadougou after getting a botched abortion. My colleagues and I put money together to buy her essential medicines, but she eventually died–even after we administered the medicines. We were shocked. And I thought, we must do something to improve women’s reproductive health. When I think that this woman could have been saved if she’d had access to family planning earlier, I’m reminded of my reason for becoming a midwife–to save human beings.

But family planning doesn’t start with midwives or doctors. It starts with political will and with money. If political leaders want to  improve women’s access to contraception and reproductive health services in their communities, they can act on this commitment by making a line item for these services in their local budgets, the local government’s plan for how it will spend public money. Continue reading “For the first time, communes in Burkina Faso’s Sahel region add family planning to their budgets”

Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor is Vice President for health programs at Management Sciences for Health. This post originally appeared on STAT News

Midwifery students in Sierra Leone, which has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. Funding for safe pregnancy and delivery worldwide is threatened by President Trump’s reinstatement of the global gag rule. (Photo by MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump’s reinstatement of the Mexico City Policy, better known as the global gag rule, came as no surprise to anyone working in the field of global health. We have been through this before — in 1984, when the policy was first put into effect by President Reagan, and then in 1993, 2001, and 2009, when it was repealed, reinstated, and repealed again.

The Mexico City Policy is called a gag rule because it limits not just what organizations and health providers do but what they are permitted to say. It prevents foreign organizations that receive US government funding from performing abortions — even if they are using funds from non-US government sources and even if abortion is completely legal in their countries.

The global gag rule also steps right between a woman and her doctor, nurse, or midwife, preventing these frontline health providers from telling their patients about the full, legal range of health options available to them. It forbids trusted advisers from giving honest, comprehensive health advice and information. I started my career as a nurse-midwife, and then worked in maternal and newborn health programs in Africa and Asia, so I know what this will mean for the lives and health of women and their families. Continue reading “Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients”

Keeping it real: Accountability for women’s, children’s, and adolescents’ health during the SDG era

“It’s important we ask women what’s actually happening on the ground. After all these strategies and initiatives, women are still giving birth on the floor. And they have to get their own water!” said Caroline Maposhere, a Zimbabwean nurse-midwife and civil society advocate, from the floor of the 5th Annual Breakfast for Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health, September 18.

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Caroline Maposhere shares her experience working as a midwife in Zimbabwe. (Photo by J. Cook Photography)

Continue reading “Keeping it real: Accountability for women’s, children’s, and adolescents’ health during the SDG era”

Moving beyond the budget line: Fundraising for family planning in Mali

Pour une version en français, s’il vous plaît voir ci-dessous.

Adama Sanogo is Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health in Mali.

For years now, countries around the world have made pledges, built coalitions, and developed strategies to demonstrate their resolute commitment to maternal health. On the surface, it seems as though a lot is happening in the realm of reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (RMNCAH). But these statements fall flat if women and newborns are still dying from preventable causes and if women, including girls, still do not have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services to lead healthy lives. Achieving the commitment or the law is only part of the advocacy story; actually, it is really only the beginning. To see this story through, we have to follow the money. Continue reading “Moving beyond the budget line: Fundraising for family planning in Mali”

Health workers: The unattended resource

Melissa Wanda Kirowo is Advocacy Project Officer with the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health, based in Nairobi, Kenya. Melissa was nominated for the 120 Under 40 Project by family planning colleagues for her substantial contributions to reproductive health at the national level or local level. Learn more about Melissa’s work and vote here until July 10!

Clementina Ilukol, a Ugandan midwife, and I discuss challenges health workers face everyday.

At Women Deliver 2016 last month, I had the opportunity to talk with one of a number of young midwives attending the conference. Clementina IIukol, a 22 year-old Ugandan midwife, represents the commitment of health care providers as they work, often under very difficult conditions, to provide essential services to women, newborns, children, and adolescents in the communities they serve. “I walk for miles before daybreak,” Clementina told me, “to fetch water for use at the clinic where I work.”

A week after Women Deliver, global health security was the top subject of discussion at the World Health Assembly, as member states recognize that sustainable development will be unattainable if resilient health systems cannot withstand epidemics like the Ebola, MERS, and Zika viruses. Ultimately, global health security requires individual health security; we must not only support rapid detection and response to cross-border infectious disease threats, but we must also guarantee that every individual has access to safe and effective health care. And what this requires, in turn, is an adequate, equitably distributed, skilled, and well-equipped health workforce. Healthcare workers, like Clementina, turn aspirations into actions. They constantly ‘innovate,’ building bridges to work failing health systems so that everyone facing a health emergency can get the treatment they need. Continue reading “Health workers: The unattended resource”

A new chapter for FCI’s lifesaving mission!

Amy Boldosser-Boesch is the Senior Technical Director for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH). To receive updates in your inbox from the FCI Program and other MSH programs, please subscribe here.

Photo: Catherine Lalonde
Photo: Catherine Lalonde

A lot has happened since we first announced, a couple of months ago, the exciting news that a new chapter has begun for FCI’s mission to save women’s lives!

Now a part of Management Sciences for Health, the FCI Program of MSH has hit the ground running. Continue reading “A new chapter for FCI’s lifesaving mission!”

VIDEO- Countdown to 2015: A decade of tracking progress for maternal, newborn, and child survival

This new video looks at the past and to the future of Countdown to 2015, a global movement of academics, governments, international agencies, health-care professional associations, donors, and nongovernmental organizations to stimulate and support country progress towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Countdown launched its last report of the MDG era—a final accounting of progress and remaining gaps in the 75 countries that have more than 95% of all maternal, newborn and child deaths—at the Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference in Mexico City.

FCI is proud to be the co-lead communications and advocacy partner in Countdown to 2015.

A Decade of Tracking Progress for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival: Lessons from Countdown to 2015 for monitoring and accountability in the SDG era

By Zulfiqar A. Bhutta and Mickey Chopra

Zulfiqar Bhutta, of the Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children (Canada) and Aga Khan University (Pakistan), and Mickey Chopra, of The World Bank, are co-chairs of Countdown to 2015. This article originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog as part of a series for the Global Maternal and Newborn Health Conference, October 2015 in Mexico City.

‘Ten years from now, in 2015,’ said the opening line of the first Countdown to 2015 report, published in 2005, ‘the governments of the world will meet to assess if we have achieved the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the most widely ratified set of development goals ever, signed onto by every country in the world.’

Continue reading “A Decade of Tracking Progress for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival: Lessons from Countdown to 2015 for monitoring and accountability in the SDG era”

Interview with Salimata Sourgou, Burkina Faso program assistant

Salimata Sourgou comes from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. She joined FCI as an administrative assistant in our office in Ouagadougou, and since last year, she has worked as a program assistant on the Mobilizing Advocates from Civil Society (MACS) project, which brings together civil society organizations and equips them with skills to be effective advocates. We spoke with her ​​about her work as a member of the FCI Burkina Faso team.

Photo by Catherine Lalonde
Photo by Catherine Lalonde

Continue reading “Interview with Salimata Sourgou, Burkina Faso program assistant”