Estrategias de abogacía para promover la partería en México

Por Eliana Monteforte y Aishling Thurow

(Read the English version here.)

Fotografía por Eliana Monteforte/ MSH

Las parteras son la primera línea en la atención en salud materna, y pueden constituirse en potentes defensoras de cambios ya que conocen los enormes obstáculos que atentan contra su capacidad de brindar una atención de cálida a cada mujer que reciben en su centro de salud o su comunidad. Ellas conocen perfectamente las necesidades en salud de las mujeres y sus bebés debido a que trabajan cada día para satisfacer dichas necesidades. Identifican las limitaciones en los sistemas de salud – en términos de recursos, personal, establecimientos y políticas- y permanentemente bregan para solventarlas. Y manifiestan abiertamente sus necesidades de capacitación, supervisión y políticas más justas, porque a esta labor que han dedicado sus vidas y representa su sustento.

El gobierno mexicano ha sido receptivo a la necesidad de fortalecer el rol de la partería profesional en el continuo de atención a la mujer, y las parteras han aprovechado esta voluntad política para hacer incidencia política a favor de su profesión en sus respectivos estados.  En febrero de 2018, el Programa de FCI en MSH, con apoyo de la Fundación John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur convocó a equipos de parteras y profesionales de salud de cinco estados mexicanos a que desarrollaran planes estratégicos de abogacía. El propósito del taller fue promover políticas estatales que permitan a las parteras brindar una atención de calidad y respetuosa a las mujeres, las adolescentes y los recién nacidos. Continue reading “Estrategias de abogacía para promover la partería en México”

Advocacy strategies for advancing midwifery in Mexico

By Eliana Monteforte and Aishling Thurow

(Leer la versión de español aquí.)

Eliana Monteforte is a Senior Technical Advisor, and Aishling Thurow is a Project Support Associate at Management  Sciences for Health

Photo by Eliana Monteforte/ MSH

Midwives can be powerful advocates for change because, as frontline health workers, they know all too well the enormous challenges that threaten their ability to deliver high-quality care to every woman they see in their clinic or community.  Midwives understand the health care needs of women and newborns because they work to meet those needs every day. They see the gaps in their health care systems–in resources, staffing, facilities, and policies–because they continuously struggle to fill those gaps. And they speak the truth about their needs for training, support, and enabling policies–because this is the job to which they have dedicated their lives and livelihoods.

The Mexican government is receptive to strengthening the role of professional midwifery in the continuum of women’s health care, and midwives are ready to leverage this political will to advocate for their profession in their respective states. In February, the FCI Program of MSH, with support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, convened teams of midwifery providers from five Mexican states to develop advocacy strategies to advance state-level policies that enable midwives to provide high-quality, respectful care for women, adolescents, and newborns. Continue reading “Advocacy strategies for advancing midwifery in Mexico”

Identifying and Treating Gestational Diabetes Among Women Living with HIV in Ethiopia

By Mebrahtu Abraha Gebremikael, Elke Konings and Christie Roberts, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)

This article originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) blog

Gestational diabetes may be a neglected contributor to the continuing high rates of maternal and neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Without proper care, gestational diabetes—high blood sugar that is detected during pregnancy (and can include previously undetected pre-pregnancy diabetes)—increases the risk of eclampsia, miscarriage, obstructed labor, hemorrhage and fetal death, yet pregnant women in developing countries are rarely screened for the condition. Gestational diabetes is also a leading risk factor for preterm birth and stillbirth and can lead to other newborn health complications, such as abnormal birth weight, congenital malformation, respiratory distress syndrome and hypoglycemia.

recent study conducted in Ethiopia by Management Sciences for Health at one rural and two urban health centers in the Tigray Region of Ethiopia aimed to understand the prevalence of gestational diabetes in Ethiopia and its risk factors and assess the feasibility of integrating low-cost services for gestational diabetes into antenatal care. The study found that relatively simple and low-cost interventions could help manage gestational diabetes for many women—but there were different outcomes among women living with HIV and those without the condition. Continue reading “Identifying and Treating Gestational Diabetes Among Women Living with HIV in Ethiopia”

Midwives of Hidalgo

Videographer: Pablo Romo Alvarez

Professional midwives provide lifesaving care to women and newborns. The government of Hidalgo state, Mexico, has launched a comprehensive midwifery program that aims to improve maternal health outcomes while providing services to women along the continuum of care, from pre-pregnancy to delivery and the immediate postnatal period

With funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the FCI Program of MSH works with midwives and maternal health service providers to strengthen advocacy and build evidence for midwifery practice in six states in Mexico.

 

 

Targeting Gestational Diabetes During Antenatal Care: Experience from Ethiopia

By Mebrahtu Abraha Gebremikael, Elke Konings and Christie Roberts, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)

This article originally appeared on the blog for the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)

Photo by Warren Zelman

Even as more women in Ethiopia are receiving antenatal care (ANC) services, coming earlier in their pregnancies and more frequently for care, maternal mortality remains high. The leading causes of maternal death include hypertension, eclampsia, hemorrhage and obstructed labor, all of which are more common among women with gestational diabetes, or high blood sugar that is detected during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can also have serious effects on babies, including abnormal birth weight, congenital malformation, respiratory distress syndrome or stillbirth. Evidence suggests that gestational diabetes is highly treatable and, since it is associated with other conditions, there may be opportunities for integrated treatment approaches. But pregnant women in Ethiopia are rarely screened for this condition, which contributes to gaps in diagnosis and the measurement of prevalence. In fact, it is not clear how widespread the problem is around the world: Varying estimates show gestational diabetes affecting less than 1% to as many as 28% of pregnant women globally. Continue reading “Targeting Gestational Diabetes During Antenatal Care: Experience from Ethiopia”

« J’ai retrouvé ma personnalité et ma dignité ».

Photo: Adama Sanogo/MSH

For English, click here.

Le programme FCI de Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Sciences de la santé pour la santé, avec le soutien du Sous-cluster humanitaire SGBV (financé par UNFPA), travaille avec des points focaux villageois formés pour référer les survivants de les survivants de la violence basée sur le genre (VBG) 59 villages vers des services médicaux et psychosociaux gratuits dans 9 hôpitaux et pharmacies de Mopti. Une cliente de 15 ans et une survivante de viol familial racontent son histoire. Continue reading “« J’ai retrouvé ma personnalité et ma dignité ».”

“I got my dignity back.”

Photo: Adama Sanogo/MSH

Pour le français, cliquez ici.

The FCI Program of Management  Sciences for Health, with support from the SGBV Humanitarian Subcluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies in the Mopti region of central Mali. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. Continue reading ““I got my dignity back.””

Scenes from Midwifery Training: Helping Mothers Survive

By Nongma Sawadogo and Alanna Savage

Nongma Sawadogo leads work on women’s and children’s health for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in Burkina Faso, and Alanna Savage is senior communications specialist for the FCI Program of MSH. 

Burkina Faso has unacceptably high national rates of maternal and newborn mortality, but health indicators are the poorest in the Sahel, North and East where many more women and children are dying from preventable causes due to poor quality of care.

With support from Johnson & Johnson and working closely with the Division of Family Health, the Ministry of Health, UNFPA, the School of Public Health and national midwifery associations, the FCI Program of MSH is leading an intensive training, supervision and mentorship program to improve midwives’ mastery of life-saving clinical skills. The training program covers three modules: (1) compassionate care for mothers and newborns, (2) Helping Mothers Survive, and (3) Helping Babies Breathe.

Continue reading “Scenes from Midwifery Training: Helping Mothers Survive”

A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care

This story originally appeared on the Management Sciences for Health website.

When her rapist was arrested, 16-year old Brigitte* thought the worst was behind her. But when she discovered she was pregnant, she had little choice but to drop out of school and work the family fields in her village, in the Manika health zone of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). She certainly could not afford antenatal care (ANC) visits.

The DRC government has made maternal health one of its highest priorities, and partners like the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) have collaborated with the Ministry of Health to make that vision a reality. Knowing that ANC visits are out-of-reach for many women, IHPplus subsidizes free and reduced-cost care for expectant mothers. And knowing that many women are not aware of the benefits of ANC visits, IHPplus has organized a variety of campaigns to educate mothers-to-be. Continue reading “A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care”

Building Health Systems that Work for Mothers, Newborns and Midwives

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor, a former practicing midwife, is the Vice President of the Health Programs Group at Management Sciences for Health (MSH). This post originally appeared on MSH’s Global Health Impact Blog

A midwife leads a pregnancy club in eastern Uganda. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)

For many people living in poor and underserved regions – whether rural communities or growing cities – midwives are the health system. Continue reading “Building Health Systems that Work for Mothers, Newborns and Midwives”