A Decade of Tracking Progress for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival: Lessons from Countdown to 2015 for monitoring and accountability in the SDG era

By Zulfiqar A. Bhutta and Mickey Chopra

Zulfiqar Bhutta, of the Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children (Canada) and Aga Khan University (Pakistan), and Mickey Chopra, of The World Bank, are co-chairs of Countdown to 2015. This article originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog as part of a series for the Global Maternal and Newborn Health Conference, October 2015 in Mexico City.

‘Ten years from now, in 2015,’ said the opening line of the first Countdown to 2015 report, published in 2005, ‘the governments of the world will meet to assess if we have achieved the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the most widely ratified set of development goals ever, signed onto by every country in the world.’

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Interview with Salimata Sourgou, Burkina Faso program assistant

Salimata Sourgou comes from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. She joined FCI as an administrative assistant in our office in Ouagadougou, and since last year, she has worked as a program assistant on the Mobilizing Advocates from Civil Society (MACS) project, which brings together civil society organizations and equips them with skills to be effective advocates. We spoke with her ​​about her work as a member of the FCI Burkina Faso team.

Photo by Catherine Lalonde
Photo by Catherine Lalonde

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The economic and social impacts of maternal death  

Guest post by Tezeta Tulloch, communications manager at the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University. This post originally appeared on the BMC Blog.

What happens when a mother dies? In the West, the most ready and obvious answer is grief – the harrowing emotional and psychological toll of losing a loved one. A mother’s death is largely viewed as a private tragedy that will grow more manageable in time.

But in many developing countries, a mother’s death is much more than an emotional crisis, often leading to long-term social and economic breakdown, both for her immediate family and the wider community. This topic is explored in new depth, in a special issue launched today in Reproductive Health (an open-access journal).

“The True Cost of Maternal Death: Individual Tragedy Impacts Family, Community and Nations” focuses exclusively on the immediate and longer-term effects of maternal death on surviving children, households, and communities. It features seven studies, with data drawn from four African countries – Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa.

The research was conducted by two research groups, one led by Harvard’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, and the other a consortium made up of Family Care International, the International Center for Research on Women, and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)-CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration. The results provide hard evidence that a mother’s loss can devastate the livelihoods, quality of life, and survival chances of those she leaves behind.

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The supplement features seven studies, with data drawn from four African countries – Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa. Photo via Pixabay

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African youth amplify their voices at CPD

By Kigen Korir, National Programme Coordinator, SRHR Alliance in Kenya; Hellen Owino, Advocacy Officer, Centre for the Study of Adolescents in Kenya; and Lara van Kouterik, Senior Programme Officer SRHR, Simavi in The Netherlands

We have the largest generation of young people ever.

The world must listen to young people’s voices. It must ensure that we have the opportunity to influence policies that affect us, especially in setting the new development agenda for the era beyond 2015. It must understand that young people know what they want and need, and are committed to safeguarding their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).

Too often, the voices of young people are drowned out by those of adult policymakers who think they know what young people need and assume young people are “too young” to articulate their issues effectively. For many years, these assumptions have limited the opportunities and constricted the space for young people to participate meaningfully in the creation of the development programs and policies that will have a direct impact on their lives.

At a recent side event during the Commission on Population and Development, young people voiced their concerns, shared best practices, and discussed key issues with other stakeholders. The event was hosted by Simavi (an NGO based in the Netherlands), the permanent mission of Ghana to the UN, and SRHR Alliances from Ghana, Kenya, Uganda, and Malawi, and was attended by representatives, including youth, from country delegations; SRHR advocates; policy makers; and young people.

Aisha Twalibu of YECE Malawi
Aisha Twalibu of YECE Malawi

“Involving young people in SRHR is a basic right enshrined in the laws of many countries, and it is therefore incumbent for countries to observe the same,” explained Edith Asamani, a youth representative from Curious Minds Ghana.

Aisha Twalibu, a youth representative from YECE in Malawi, explained to the group that young people are a diverse group with different needs, and that listening to their voices will help governments, CSOs and development agencies tailor SRHR programs to their needs.

Three other young Africans shared case studies on youth SRHR programs. First, Chris Kyewe from Family Life Education Programme described his peer education program in Uganda, in which youth peer educators (YPEs) are trained to give SRHR information and education to their peers and refer young people to local health centers where trained healthcare providers offer youth-friendly services. In addition to education, YPEs also provide their peers with condoms and oral contraceptive pills, together with instructions on how to use them. This example showed how young people are meaningfully engaged in the implementation of the program.

Then Hellen Owino from the Centre for the Study of Adolescents in Kenya shared that comprehensive sexuality education programs in Kenya empower young people to make informed choices about their health and sexuality. CSA and the Kenya SRHR Alliance have been engaged in advocacy to include comprehensive sexuality education in the national curriculum of Kenya. She also shared that CSE programs should be appealing and interactive, for example by using ICT and social media, to capture the attention of young people. Justine Saidi, the Principal Secretary for Youth in Malawi also called for the active involvement of parents in demanding that young people have access to sexuality information.

Charles Banda from YONECO shared the last case study that focused on preventing child marriage in Malawi. He shared his experience in working with youth-led organizations to build awareness on the negative impact of child marriages on girls and communities, creating a more enabling environment for young girls to exercise their rights. He also described how civil society organizations in Malawi have advocated successfully to raise the legal age of marriage to 18 years, which was recently made into law by the President of Malawi.

Highlighting lessons from the women’s movement, the side event concluded with a discussion of key strategies for youth advocates, including:

  • Mobilizing a critical mass of young people
  • Holding governments accountable for fulfilling their national and international commitments
  • Investing in ensuring that health data can be disaggregated by age group, especially for young people aged 10 to 14
  • Identifying champions at all levels to advance the youth and SRHR agenda

It is time that young people’s views and concerns are incorporated into the new development agenda. Without listening to young people, no country will be able to realize the potential of the demographic dividend that comes with this generation.

 

 

 

Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage: translating promise into reality

By Melissa Wanda, Advocacy Officer, Family Care International – Kenya

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Taskforce blog.

In Kenya, where I work as an advocate for women’s health and rights, women continue to die during pregnancy and childbirth at alarming rates. Approximately 25% of these deaths are due to heavy bleeding following childbirth, also known as postpartum hemorrhage or PPH. More than half of women deliver at home; that proportion can be even higher in some counties with limited infrastructure and predominantly rural populations. Even in cases where a woman arrives to a health facility in time, she can still face significant barriers to receive the care she needs:

  • supplies needed for childbirth—such as a blood pressure cuff or clean gloves—may not be available;
  • essential medicines—such as oxytocin or misoprostol, which can prevent or treat postpartum bleeding—may be in short supply; and
  • a skilled health provider may not be present to provide the care a woman needs to have a safe delivery.

A key strategy for improving maternal health is to ensure that every woman has access to effective medicines to prevent and treat PPH during childbirth. Oxytocin and misoprostol are proven, lifesaving medicines for the prevention and treatment of PPH. Misoprostol offers a number of advantages for women living in remote, rural areas: misoprostol does not need refrigeration, is available in tablet form and can, therefore, be administered with no specialized equipment or skills. Misoprostol provides an effective option for preventing and treating PPH in settings such as homes and health facilities lacking electricity, refrigeration and IV equipment.

For these reasons, Kenya’s Ministry of Health established a national-level task force to provide a common forum for addressing policy-level issues related to the use of misoprostol for the prevention and treatment of PPH. While misoprostol is registered in Kenya for the management of PPH, and national guidelines govern its use, studies have shown that misoprostol’s procurement and availability in public health facilities is irregular and inconsistent.

This national, multi-stakeholder task force—composed of government, NGO, research, faith-based and health profession representatives[1]—was tasked with spearheading access to and use of misoprostol for PPH. Beginning in 2014, the Misoprostol Task Force, convened by the ministry of health, met regularly to identify the key policy gaps at the national level and to take concrete action. Key policy priorities identified by the Task Force:

  • Harmonize the national clinical guidelines:  Kenya has numerous clinical management guidelines advising health professionals on how to administer misoprostol for all its indications (PPH, induction of labor and post-abortion care): the 2009 Clinical Guidelines for Management and Referral of Common Conditions at Levels 4-6 and the 2012 National Guidelines for Quality Obstetric and Perinatal Care. While these guidelines recommend the use of misoprostol to prevent and treat PPH when oxytocin is unavailable, they do not reflect the latest evidence and were inconsistent with each other. The Task Force developed a handout that harmonizes these different guidelines and produced a job aid for health workers. Both documents are waiting approval by the ministry of health; once approved, they will be disseminated at the national and sub-national/county levels.
  • Revise the national essential medicine list: While the Kenya Essential Medicine List(KEML, 2010) classifies misoprostol as a complementary and core[2] oxytocic drug, no specification is made for its use in PPH prevention or treatment. The Task Force drafted a letter to the National Medicines and Therapeutics Committee, to call for the addition of misoprostol to the KEML for PPH prevention and treatment at all levels of the health system. This letter will likely be deliberated by the committee when it meets this year to update the KEML.

Continued advocacy is still needed to ensure these positive developments in the Kenyan national policy framework translate into actual improvements in the availability and use of misoprostol. The Task Force has served as a critical forum for bringing together key stakeholders, promoting national level discussion and supporting effective action.

For more information and tools for conducting effective advocacy:

Scaling up Misoprostol for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Moving from Evidence to Action

Advocacy, Approval, Access: Misoprostol for Postpartum Hemorrhage A Guide for Effective Advocacy

This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies CaucusFamily Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.

[1] Membership includes representatives from the Ministry of Health-Reproductive Maternal Health Services Unit, Family Care International-Kenya, PATH, Management Sciences for Health, the Population Council, UNFPA, AMREF, Institute of Family Medicine (INFAMED), Christian Health Association of Kenya (CHAK), Jhpiego, the World Health Organization and professional organizations of gynecologists and nurses.

[2] The Core List represents the priority needs for the health care system. Medicines on the Core List are considered to be the most efficacious, safe and cost‐effective; are expected to be routinely available in health facilities; and should be affordable to the majority of the population.  Complimentary medicines are essential medicines needed for specialized diagnostic or monitoring facilities, and/or specialist medical care, and/or specialist training.

Budgeting for better maternal and child health

Catherine Lalonde is FCI’s senior program officer for Francophone Africa.

I just returned from a week in Senegal where I attended a regional workshop to train civil society, parliamentarians and the media on budget analysis and advocacy for maternal and child health.

For years now, countries across the globe have said that maternal health is one of their top priorities; they’ve made statements, built coalitions, and developed strategies. On the surface, it seems as though a lot is happening in the realm of reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH). Despite all the rhetoric, little progress has been made in improving the health of mothers and children, especially in the poorest countries in the world.

Since I started working at FCI a year ago, I have mainly been involved in advocacy projects aimed at keeping governments accountable to their commitments. In Burkina Faso, Mali and Kenya, we and our partners are constantly asking governments to invest in and implement programs that will improve RMNCH in their countries.  Whenever we question why contraceptives aren’t available in the villages or why health centers are not staffed with qualified personnel, we almost always gets the same answers: there’s no money, we don’t have the funding, and we can’t afford it.

A budget is the single best indicator of a country’s priorities and the best way to tell whether a country is putting its money where its mouth is and whether or not it has taken steps towards fulfilling its maternal and child health commitments.

Fatimata Kané
Fatimata Kané, FCI-Mali national director, explains the importance of budget advocacy in improving RMNCH outcomes.

Organized by Harmonization for Health in Africa, UNICEF, WHO, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH), Save the Children, the InterParliamentary Union and FCI, the three-day budget advocacy workshop brought together members of local NGOs and reporters, along with parliamentarians and representatives from the ministries of finance and of health from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso and Senegal.

A budget is public property; it represents the money that belongs to each and every citizen of a country and therefore, the public should have a genuine say in how the money is distributed and spent. But the countries represented in the workshop had budgets that rank among the least transparent in the world, according to the International Budget Partnership’s Open Budget Survey, which reveals what information is made public and when, as well as who gets to contribute to the process and how often. Of the workshop’s participating countries, Burkina Faso’s budget had the best transparency score– a measly 23 out of a 100; Niger, with the least transparent budget, scored a depressing 4 out of 100, with zero meaningful opportunities for civil society to contribute to the country’s budgeting process.

The workshop facilitators emphasized the important role the budget plays in RMNCH and the financial costs of not investing in RMNCH. It also taught how good health policies are developed and costed, and provided options for increasing fiscal space – the money to fund these policies – within the existing budget. This workshop provided participants with an outline of the budgeting process, and all of the opportunities in which civil society should be able to contribute. At the end, each of the delegations developed advocacy objectives and strategies to improve civil society’s contribution to the budgeting process in order to prioritize health. For example, the Burkina Faso delegation chose to advocate for increased investment in information systems to better track health data while the Malian delegation chose to focus advocacy on ensuring that Mali meets the Abuja declaration pledge to dedicate 15% of its budget to health.

A good friend of mine who works in finance once told me that talking about money scares people, that people often feel as though they don’t have enough knowledge to contribute and are too embarrassed to say so. The organizers and I were afraid that the workshop would be too long, too technical and hard to follow, but we couldn’t have been more wrong. The participants lapped up every word on every slide, and were thrilled to be equipped with the knowledge of the role they can play in ensuring that their country’s budget prioritizes maternal and child health.

The presentation on increasing fiscal space even got a standing ovation!

 

 

Advocacy success story: Burkina Faso broadens access to misoprostol, an essential maternal health medicine

By Brahima Bassane, MD

[Version française ci-dessous]

Brahima Bassane, FCI’s national director in Burkina Faso, is a public health physician.

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) — excessive, uncontrolled bleeding after childbirth —remains the leading cause of maternal death worldwide.  In countries like Burkina Faso, where many births still occur at home, the drug misoprostol offers a number of advantages for preventing and treating PPH because (unlike oxytocin, considered the ‘gold standard’ medicine for PPH) it can be easily administered and does not require cold storage. In settings with limited infrastructure and lack of skilled birth attendants, misoprostol may be a woman’s only chance for surviving PPH.

Access to high-quality medicines is part of every citizen’s right to the highest attainable standard of health. But in spite of misoprostol’s proven safety and efficacy, decision-makers in some countries have been reluctant to authorize its widespread availability, or are unaware of the available evidence. Many governments have not included misoprostol in their national essential medicine list (EML), which is often used as the basis for importation, distribution, and marketing of medicines for the public health system.

FCI works to support wider understanding, acceptance, and use of misoprostol for PPH. This year in Burkina Faso, our efforts — with a range of advocacy partners — to persuade government officials to deem misoprostol for PPH an essential medicine were successful. This success story offers a potential model for effective, collaborative, focused advocacy in other countries where misoprostol’s lifesaving benefits are not yet broadly available.

Our advocacy began in earnest last September, when FCI convened a meeting  to share the latest research on misoprostol for PPH and to develop advocacy strategies that would convince the government to take action. These committed and motivated maternal health champions called for the widespread availability of misoprostol, stating that the inclusion of misoprostol in the national EML was an urgent national priority.

Following the meeting, a small advisory committee was assigned the task of reaching key government decision makers. The committee submitted a letter and technical note to the Director-General of Pharmacy, Medicines, and Laboratories (DGPML) requesting inclusion of misoprostol on the EML. A DGPML technical committee then reviewed the submitted application, gathering all available evidence on misoprostol. During this review period, FCI and our partners met again with the Director-General of the DGPML, who stated his support for misoprostol as a critical tool for reducing the burden of PPH in Burkina Faso. FCI and partners also met with the Secretary-General of the Ministry of Health, who affirmed the government’s responsibility for ensuring the availability of misoprostol for PPH at public health facilities. He also came out in support of misoprostol distribution at the community level, and recommended ongoing supervision and training to ensure its correct use.

In February of this year, all of these advocacy efforts paid off: the 2014 revision of the national EML (Liste Nationale Des Medicaments et Consommables Medicaux Essentials, Edition 2014) includes misoprostol both for prevention and for treatment of PPH.

While this is an important step in making misoprostol available in the government health system, FCI and our partners will continue advocating and working to ensure that all women have access to a uterotonic , like misoprostol or oxytocin, for effective prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage. These efforts are critical for countries’ efforts to fulfill the promise of MDG 5 and put an end, once and for all, to preventable maternal death.

Learn more about FCI’s work on misoprostol for PPH here.

To join an online community on misoprostol for PPH, please click here.

 

Réussite exemplaire du plaidoyer : Le Burkina Faso élargit l’accès au misoprostol, un médicament essentiel de la santé maternelle

Par Brahima Bassane, MD– médecin en titre

Directeur national de FCI au Burkina Faso, Brahima Bassane est médecin de santé publique.

L’Hémorragie du post-partum (HPP) — des saignements excessifs, difficiles à arrêter survenant après l’accouchement — demeure la principale cause de décès maternels à travers le monde. Dans des pays tels que le Burkina Faso où un nombre important des accouchements surviennent encore à domicile, le médicament misoprostol fournit nombre d’avantages pour la prévention et le traitement de l’HPP dans la mesure où il peut être facilement administré et ne nécessite pas une conservation à dans un réfrigérateur (contrairement à l’ocytocine qui est considérée comme le médicament ‘de référence’ pour l’HPP).Le misoprostol peut représenter la seule chance de survie d’une femme en proie à l’HPP dans les milieux communautaires qui disposent d’un nombre insuffisant de centres de santé et d’accoucheuses qualifiées.

L’accès à des médicaments de haute qualité est un des droits de chaque citoyen pour lui permettre de jouir du meilleur état de santé possible. Toutefois, en dépit de l’innocuité et de l’efficacité reconnues du misoprostol, les décideurs ont été dans certains pays, réticents à autoriser sa mise à disposition généralisée ou ils ignorent les données disponibles. Plusieurs gouvernements n’ont pas inclus le misoprostol dans leur liste des médicaments essentiels (LME) qui est souvent utilisée comme critère pour l’importation, la distribution et la commercialisation de médicaments pour le système de santé publique.

FCI œuvre en vue de soutenir une meilleure compréhension, acceptation et utilisation du misoprostol pour l’HPP. Au Burkina Faso, nos initiatives —de concert avec un éventail de partenaires du plaidoyer —visant à convaincre cette année les responsables gouvernementaux de considérer le misoprostol pour l’HPP comme un médicament essentiel, ont été couronnées de succès. Cette réussite exemplaire fournit un modèle potentiel de plaidoyer efficace, mené en collaboration et bien ciblé dans d’autres pays où les avantages salvateurs du misoprostol ne sont pas encore largement disponibles.

Notre plaidoyer a véritablement débuté en septembre 2013 lorsque FCI a organisé une réunion en vue de partager les résultats des toutes dernières recherches sur le misoprostol pour l’HPP et de mettre au point des stratégies de plaidoyer qui convaincraient le gouvernement à prendre les bonnes décisions. Ces défenseurs engagés et motivés de la santé maternelle se sont prononcés pour la mise à disposition généralisée du misoprostol en indiquant que l’inclusion du misoprostol dans la Liste nationale des médicaments essentiels était une priorité nationale.

Suite à la réunion, la tâche de prendre contact avec les principaux décideurs gouvernementaux a été confiée à un petit comité consultatif. Le comité a présenté au Directeur Général de la Pharmacie, du Médicament et des Laboratoires (DGPML) une lettre et une note technique sollicitant l’inclusion du misoprostol dans la LME. Un comité technique de la DGPML a ensuite examiné la demande soumise en recueillant toutes les données disponibles relatives au misoprostol. Au cours de cette période d’examen, FCI et nos partenaires se sont réunis avec le Directeur Général de la GPML qui a exprimé son soutien pour le misoprostol comme outil crucial pour alléger le fardeau de l’HPP au Burkina Faso. Cette équipe restreinte de FCI et ses partenaires s’est également réunie avec le Secrétaire Général du Ministère de la Santé qui a affirmé la responsabilité du gouvernement à assurer la disponibilité du misoprostol pour l’HPP dans les établissements de santé. Il s’est également prononcé en faveur de la distribution du misoprostol jusqu’à l’échelle communautaire  tout en recommandant une supervision suivie et la formation afin de garantir son utilisation adéquate.

En février au cours de cette année 2014, toutes ces initiatives du plaidoyer ont porté leurs fruits : la révision en 2014 de la LNMCE (Liste Nationale Des Médicaments et Consommables Médicaux Essentiels, Édition 2014) comprend notamment le misoprostol pour la prévention ainsi que le traitement de l’HPP.

Bien que la mise à disposition du misoprostol dans le système public de santé constitue une étape importante, FCI et nos partenaires continueront à plaider et à œuvrer pour veiller à ce que toutes les femmes aient accès à un utérotonique tel que le misoprostol ou l’ocytocine pour une prévention et un traitement efficaces de l’hémorragie du post-partum. Ces initiatives sont cruciales pour les efforts des pays à tenir leur promesse pour l’OMD5 et à définitivement mettre un terme aux décès maternels évitables.

Trouvez de plus amples informations relatives aux travaux de FCI sur le misoprostol pour l’HPP.

Veuillez cliquer ici pour intégrer une communauté virtuelle sur le misoprostol pour l’HPP.

Igniting national efforts to save lives: lunch with African heads of state

Edwinah Arwah Orowe is Advocacy Program Officer with FCI-Kenya, based at our office in Nairobi. Last week, she was one of three young people invited to represent African youth at a high-level ‘working lunch’ on the Campaign on Accelerated Reduction of Maternal, Newborn and Child Mortality in Africa (CARMMA), as part of the 20th African Union Summit. Here is Edwinah’s report:

Nearly thirty African heads of state attended this important side event; countries whose head of state couldn’t be present were represented by their Ministers of Health. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon sat at the dais, together with Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund—UNFPA.  A range of other influential stakeholders also attended, including AU Commissioners, representatives of regional and international organizations, diplomats, and civil society representatives, so the table was set for a meaningful and important discussion. In his welcoming remarks, the African Union’s Commissioner for Social Affairs, Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko, said that achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and of Africa’s post-2015 objectives depends on member countries addressing preventable maternal, newborn, and child death and illness.

This event was a celebration of all of the progress that has been made since CARMMA — a continent-wide effort to mobilize national action to save women’s lives — was launched in 2009. It was also, however, a call to press on with even deeper commitment, because it is still possible to achieve a 75% decrease in maternal and child mortality by the MDG deadline in 2015. Every speaker —from the Chair of the AU Commission to the UN Secretary-General — echoed the same call, which resonated throughout the room: no woman should die while giving life.

As the African Union celebrates its Jubilee, the gift of safe motherhood is a special one that African governments must give to African women. In Africa, giving birth is a celebration, and life itself is a celebration. Every African country must ensure that every woman has access to the skilled care that she needs, and that every woman can deliver her child in a setting where she is treated with dignity.

The fact that more than half of all African heads of state attended this working lunch demonstrates that there now is a real commitment, across Africa, to meeting the maternal health needs of women. The commitment by so many African leaders to re-ignite CARMMA is a crucial step in the right direction. Now, African women and young people need to see this commitment translate into real action.