Targeting Gestational Diabetes During Antenatal Care: Experience from Ethiopia

By Mebrahtu Abraha Gebremikael, Elke Konings and Christie Roberts, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)

This article originally appeared on the blog for the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)

Photo by Warren Zelman

Even as more women in Ethiopia are receiving antenatal care (ANC) services, coming earlier in their pregnancies and more frequently for care, maternal mortality remains high. The leading causes of maternal death include hypertension, eclampsia, hemorrhage and obstructed labor, all of which are more common among women with gestational diabetes, or high blood sugar that is detected during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can also have serious effects on babies, including abnormal birth weight, congenital malformation, respiratory distress syndrome or stillbirth. Evidence suggests that gestational diabetes is highly treatable and, since it is associated with other conditions, there may be opportunities for integrated treatment approaches. But pregnant women in Ethiopia are rarely screened for this condition, which contributes to gaps in diagnosis and the measurement of prevalence. In fact, it is not clear how widespread the problem is around the world: Varying estimates show gestational diabetes affecting less than 1% to as many as 28% of pregnant women globally. Continue reading “Targeting Gestational Diabetes During Antenatal Care: Experience from Ethiopia”

« J’ai retrouvé ma personnalité et ma dignité ».

Photo: Adama Sanogo/MSH

For English, click here.

Le programme FCI de Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Sciences de la santé pour la santé, avec le soutien du Sous-cluster humanitaire SGBV (financé par UNFPA), travaille avec des points focaux villageois formés pour référer les survivants de les survivants de la violence basée sur le genre (VBG) 59 villages vers des services médicaux et psychosociaux gratuits dans 9 hôpitaux et pharmacies de Mopti. Une cliente de 15 ans et une survivante de viol familial racontent son histoire. Continue reading “« J’ai retrouvé ma personnalité et ma dignité ».”

“I got my dignity back.”

Photo: Adama Sanogo/MSH

Pour le français, cliquez ici.

The FCI Program of Management  Sciences for Health, with support from the SGBV Humanitarian Subcluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies in the Mopti region of central Mali. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. Continue reading ““I got my dignity back.””

A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care

This story originally appeared on the Management Sciences for Health website.

When her rapist was arrested, 16-year old Brigitte* thought the worst was behind her. But when she discovered she was pregnant, she had little choice but to drop out of school and work the family fields in her village, in the Manika health zone of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). She certainly could not afford antenatal care (ANC) visits.

The DRC government has made maternal health one of its highest priorities, and partners like the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) have collaborated with the Ministry of Health to make that vision a reality. Knowing that ANC visits are out-of-reach for many women, IHPplus subsidizes free and reduced-cost care for expectant mothers. And knowing that many women are not aware of the benefits of ANC visits, IHPplus has organized a variety of campaigns to educate mothers-to-be. Continue reading “A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care”