Recent Provider Training and Client Counseling Tools on Emergency Contraception

By Melissa Garcia

Melissa Garcia is the technical advisor for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception (ICEC), which is hosted by MSH. This article originally appeared on the ICEC website

Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) are an important part of the family planning method mix and for post-rape care, being the only effective way to reduce the risk of pregnancy after sex, whether unprotected, insufficiently protected or coerced.

At the global level, women have low levels of awareness of ECPs as a contraceptive option. This could be due in part that ECPs are not consistently included in contraceptive counselling, and/or because the right tools and information are lacking to dispel myths and misinformation. As ICEC’s mission is to ensure the safe and locally-appropriate use of EC in all reproductive health programming, we have made recent investments to support the global health care workforce by improving provider training and client counselling and awareness of ECPs at global, regional and national levels. In partnership with several other organisations, materials were created to provide up-to-date guidance on EC. While the focus is on levonorgestrel (LNG) ECPs–the most commonly available type of EC globally–select resources provide detail on the expanded post-coital contraceptive method mix.

ICEC has provided technical review to several global-level provider training materials, including EC training modules on FPTraining.org for providers (in English and in French) and for pharmacists (in English and in French). The latest edition of Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers has updated guidance as well; see the EC chapter here. Continue reading “Recent Provider Training and Client Counseling Tools on Emergency Contraception”

A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care

This story originally appeared on the Management Sciences for Health website.

When her rapist was arrested, 16-year old Brigitte* thought the worst was behind her. But when she discovered she was pregnant, she had little choice but to drop out of school and work the family fields in her village, in the Manika health zone of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). She certainly could not afford antenatal care (ANC) visits.

The DRC government has made maternal health one of its highest priorities, and partners like the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) have collaborated with the Ministry of Health to make that vision a reality. Knowing that ANC visits are out-of-reach for many women, IHPplus subsidizes free and reduced-cost care for expectant mothers. And knowing that many women are not aware of the benefits of ANC visits, IHPplus has organized a variety of campaigns to educate mothers-to-be. Continue reading “A door-to-door campaign for antenatal care”

Emergency contraception: The reproductive health innovation everyone should know about

By Elizabeth Westley and Monica Kerrigan

Elizabeth Westley leads the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception. Monica Kerrigan is a global leader in family planning and previously served at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and as a senior adviser to Family Planning 2020.

This article originally appeared on Devex.

Unintended pregnancies take a harrowing toll on women, young people, families and nations. When women are unable to decide whether and when to have children, maternal and newborn deaths rise, educational and economic opportunities are lost, families, communities and countries suffer greatly.

Global data highlights the tremendous challenge we face: 213 million pregnancies occur annually and an astonishing 40 percent — about 85 million — of these are unintended. In the United States alone, there are approximately 3 million unintended pregnancies each year, and in India, a staggering 18 million. A woman’s ability to make informed decisions about her reproductive health is one of the most basic human rights. It is a decision that can determine what kind of future she will have — and whether she will have one at all.

Emergency contraception is a unique tool for women to space and time their pregnancies. It is grossly underutilized, underfunded, and not fully optimized globally. It is the only contraceptive method that can be taken after unprotected sex and is effective for several days to prevent pregnancy. It is especially needed by women who have been sexually assaulted, who are often desperate to avoid becoming pregnant by their rapist. Continue reading “Emergency contraception: The reproductive health innovation everyone should know about”

A script-writer walks into a pharmacy…

By Melissa Garcia and Elizabeth Westley

Melissa Garcia is senior technical officer and Elizabeth Westley is the director of the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception (ICEC), hosted by Management Sciences for Health.

“What happened when you went to the pharmacy and asked for emergency contraception?” Melissa surveyed a room full of television and radio writers attending a workshop in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The participants looked around, waiting for someone to speak up first.

“The pharmacist gave me a look, so I had to show him my PMC badge to prove I was there for research, not for myself!” said a woman from Population Media Center, an organization that produces educational soap operas to improve the health and well-being of people around the world. Writers in Nigeria had similar stories to tell. An older man in flowing traditional robes confessed “I walked up and down the street three times before I summoned the courage to enter the store.” A young family planning (FP) advocate joined the media training in Senegal, and wearing her hijab, reported that the pharmacist demanded to know who the pill was meant for.

Melissa visits actors and writers on the set of C'est la vie in Senegal.
Melissa visits actors and writers on the set of C’est la vie in Senegal.

Continue reading “A script-writer walks into a pharmacy…”