For the first time, communes in Burkina Faso’s Sahel region add family planning to their budgets

By Nongma Sawadogo

Version française

Nongma Sawadogo leads work on women’s and children’s health for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in Burkina Faso. This article originally appeared on the K4Health Blog.  

A family planning booth at a health fair in Burkina Faso. Photo: Center for Communication Programs, Courtesy of Photoshare

When I was in training to become a midwife, a flight attendant, with no money and in critical condition, arrived at the maternity ward of Yalgado Ouédraogo hospital in Ouagadougou after getting a botched abortion. My colleagues and I put money together to buy her essential medicines, but she eventually died–even after we administered the medicines. We were shocked. And I thought, we must do something to improve women’s reproductive health. When I think that this woman could have been saved if she’d had access to family planning earlier, I’m reminded of my reason for becoming a midwife–to save human beings.

But family planning doesn’t start with midwives or doctors. It starts with political will and with money. If political leaders want to  improve women’s access to contraception and reproductive health services in their communities, they can act on this commitment by making a line item for these services in their local budgets, the local government’s plan for how it will spend public money. Continue reading “For the first time, communes in Burkina Faso’s Sahel region add family planning to their budgets”

An ounce of (after-sex) prevention: At the Family Planning Summit, let’s talk about emergency contraception

By Elizabeth Westley

Elizabeth Westley is the director of the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, where this article first appeared. 

To meet the global Family Planning 2020 goals, a full range of family planning methods must be available, including user-controlled, short-acting methods. The Guttmacher Institute’s analysis , Adding it Up, estimates that 214 million women of reproductive age in developing regions want to avoid pregnancy but are not using a modern contraceptive method.  Half of unmarried women with an unmet need for family planning report infrequent sex as the reason that they do not use a family planning method. A quarter of married women not using contraception fall into the same category.  Not feeling themselves at high levels of risk, these women may wish to avoid the appointments and waiting times, dependence on providers, side effects, discomforts, and other commitments that long-acting contraceptive methods sometimes entail. Other women may not be using modern contraception because they are unaware of their options or are faced with inaccessibility due to distance barriers, poor health infrastructures, stock outs, or high prices. As well, many women are located in humanitarian and fragile settings where contraceptive access can be challenging.  For many women and girls not currently using a long-acting contraceptive method, a simple, discreet, user-controlled, low-commitment, one-time “on demand” form of contraception that can be accessed easily and quickly is a critically important option. This method already exists: emergency contraception. Continue reading “An ounce of (after-sex) prevention: At the Family Planning Summit, let’s talk about emergency contraception”

Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor is Vice President for health programs at Management Sciences for Health. This post originally appeared on STAT News

Midwifery students in Sierra Leone, which has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. Funding for safe pregnancy and delivery worldwide is threatened by President Trump’s reinstatement of the global gag rule. (Photo by MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump’s reinstatement of the Mexico City Policy, better known as the global gag rule, came as no surprise to anyone working in the field of global health. We have been through this before — in 1984, when the policy was first put into effect by President Reagan, and then in 1993, 2001, and 2009, when it was repealed, reinstated, and repealed again.

The Mexico City Policy is called a gag rule because it limits not just what organizations and health providers do but what they are permitted to say. It prevents foreign organizations that receive US government funding from performing abortions — even if they are using funds from non-US government sources and even if abortion is completely legal in their countries.

The global gag rule also steps right between a woman and her doctor, nurse, or midwife, preventing these frontline health providers from telling their patients about the full, legal range of health options available to them. It forbids trusted advisers from giving honest, comprehensive health advice and information. I started my career as a nurse-midwife, and then worked in maternal and newborn health programs in Africa and Asia, so I know what this will mean for the lives and health of women and their families. Continue reading “Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients”

A script-writer walks into a pharmacy…

By Melissa Garcia and Elizabeth Westley

Melissa Garcia is senior technical officer and Elizabeth Westley is the director of the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception (ICEC), hosted by Management Sciences for Health.

“What happened when you went to the pharmacy and asked for emergency contraception?” Melissa surveyed a room full of television and radio writers attending a workshop in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The participants looked around, waiting for someone to speak up first.

“The pharmacist gave me a look, so I had to show him my PMC badge to prove I was there for research, not for myself!” said a woman from Population Media Center, an organization that produces educational soap operas to improve the health and well-being of people around the world. Writers in Nigeria had similar stories to tell. An older man in flowing traditional robes confessed “I walked up and down the street three times before I summoned the courage to enter the store.” A young family planning (FP) advocate joined the media training in Senegal, and wearing her hijab, reported that the pharmacist demanded to know who the pill was meant for.

Melissa visits actors and writers on the set of C'est la vie in Senegal.
Melissa visits actors and writers on the set of C’est la vie in Senegal.

Continue reading “A script-writer walks into a pharmacy…”

WE DECIDE: Young persons with disabilities call for equal rights and a life free of violence

Ariadna Capasso is Senior Technical Advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health.

Violence against women, including forced or coerced sex, is an epidemic that persists all over the world. But women with disabilities, often marginalized and denied their sexual and reproductive health rights, are particularly vulnerable to such abuse.

In June, UNFPA launched WE DECIDE, a global initiative to promote gender equality and social inclusion of young persons with disabilities and advocate for the end of sexual violence. The FCI Program of MSH worked with UNFPA and a broad range of partners in the field of disabilities to build consensus for the framework of the four-year initiative and to develop communications materials for the initiative, including a video and an infographic that conveys key messages and data on the status of persons with disabilities and gender-based violence.

Photo by the Spanish Cooperation (AECID)
An expert and advocate for persons with disabilities attends a strategy meeting to discuss the new WE DECIDE initiative. Photo by the Spanish Cooperation (AECID)

Continue reading “WE DECIDE: Young persons with disabilities call for equal rights and a life free of violence”

Moving beyond the budget line: Fundraising for family planning in Mali

Pour une version en français, s’il vous plaît voir ci-dessous.

Adama Sanogo is Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health in Mali.

For years now, countries around the world have made pledges, built coalitions, and developed strategies to demonstrate their resolute commitment to maternal health. On the surface, it seems as though a lot is happening in the realm of reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (RMNCAH). But these statements fall flat if women and newborns are still dying from preventable causes and if women, including girls, still do not have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services to lead healthy lives. Achieving the commitment or the law is only part of the advocacy story; actually, it is really only the beginning. To see this story through, we have to follow the money. Continue reading “Moving beyond the budget line: Fundraising for family planning in Mali”

Nongma Sawadogo, midwife and reproductive health champion in Burkina Faso

(Version française ci-dessous)

 

Photo by Catherine Lalonde
Photo by Catherine Lalonde

Nongma Evariste Sawadogo is a trained midwife. He joined Family Care International (FCI) two years ago as a program officer and managed Burkina Faso’s reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) projects. He will soon join Management Sciences for Health (MSH) as a member of the recently launched FCI Program.

Nongma is passionate about improving RMNCH in his country and community. He works with community-based organizations, leads workshops, provides technical support to community health facilities, and evaluates projects to advance RMNCH and to ensure the greatest impact for women and children.

Continue reading “Nongma Sawadogo, midwife and reproductive health champion in Burkina Faso”