Pregnancy clubs: Group antenatal care in Uganda and Kenya

Shafia Rashid is principal technical advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health. 

Women participate in the opening ceremony of a Lea Mimba pregnancy club session at a health facility in Kenya. (Photo by M4ID)

We were pleased to see the blog post from the Maternal Health Task Force which highlighted a review of published literature and informant interviews to develop a common model for group antenatal care (ANC), an innovative service delivery approach for re-organizing ANC in low-resource settings. In comparison to the current one-on-one model, group ANC is increasingly recognized as being more responsive to women’s and health providers’ needs,  encouraging self-care, and providing women with the emotional and social support to navigate an often isolating and stressful time in their lives. Continue reading “Pregnancy clubs: Group antenatal care in Uganda and Kenya”

Building Health Systems that Work for Mothers, Newborns and Midwives

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor, a former practicing midwife, is the Vice President of the Health Programs Group at Management Sciences for Health (MSH). This post originally appeared on MSH’s Global Health Impact Blog

A midwife leads a pregnancy club in eastern Uganda. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)

For many people living in poor and underserved regions – whether rural communities or growing cities – midwives are the health system. Continue reading “Building Health Systems that Work for Mothers, Newborns and Midwives”

Person-centered group antenatal care in Eastern Uganda: Reaching women through pregnancy clubs

By Shafia Rashid and Kate Ramsey

Shafia Rashid is a Principal Technical Advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Kate Ramsey is Senior Principal Technical Advisor for maternal and newborn health at MSH.

Women examine cards depicting health information during a pregnancy club session in eastern Uganda. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)

Improving the quality of care that women experience during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period has become a major global priority. Achieving good quality care requires not only clinical improvements, but also a person-centered approach that takes into account women’s and health workers’ needs and perspectives.

In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated its antenatal care guidelines, calling for a positive pregnancy experience through holistic, person-centered antenatal services that provide pregnant women with emotional support and advice in addition to the standard clinical assessments.

Group antenatal care, initially developed in the U.S. several decades ago, is a promising model that responds to women’s health and information concerns during pregnancy. Facilitated by a health provider, usually a nurse or midwife, group antenatal care offers a forum for pregnant women to learn more about their pregnancies, share their experiences, receive essential health and self-care information, and provide  social and emotional support to each other within the group. Health care providers meet individually with group participants after the group sessions  for routine physical and clinical care and to discuss any confidential issues. Group antenatal care can also benefit health care providers through increased job satisfaction without substantially increasing the amount of time required. Continue reading “Person-centered group antenatal care in Eastern Uganda: Reaching women through pregnancy clubs”