World Population Day 2018 highlights ineffective and unsafe pregnancy prevention behaviors and practices. What about emergency contraception?

By Melissa Garcia

Melissa Garcia is a Technical Advisor for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, hosted by MSH. This article originally appeared on the ICEC website

For this year’s World Population Day on 11 July, our community celebrated and affirmed the right to family planning. On this day, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) also called attention to the many people around the world unable to realize this right.

The Guttmacher Institute’s analysis , Adding it Up, estimates that globally, 214 million women of reproductive age in developing regions want to avoid pregnancy but are not using a modern method of contraception. One hundred and fifty five million women are not using a contraceptive method. Some 59 million women use traditional practices and remedies for pregnancy prevention. UNFPA has listed some of these practices in this article and accompanying photo essay. They are cause for concern because the users of such “pseudo” contraceptive practices act in the belief that they are protecting themselves from the risk of unintended pregnancy. But in fact they are exposing themselves to that risk, and potentially to further health consequences.

This phenomenon affects emergency contraception (EC) as well. The majority of women are not aware that a contraceptive option after sex exists, in most countries that capture EC knowledge in their most recent Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data.  Most women have never heard of the dedicated, safe and effective pill, and copper- IUD regimens that are the only effective post-coital method. Continue reading “World Population Day 2018 highlights ineffective and unsafe pregnancy prevention behaviors and practices. What about emergency contraception?”

Top tips for advocates working on emergency contraception

By Melissa Garcia and Cristina Puig Borrás

Melissa Garcia is Technical Adviser for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception (ICEC), hosted by MSH. Cristina Puig Borrás is the Coordinator for the European Consortium for Emergency Contraception. This article orginally appeared on ICEC’s website

Photo: Susana Galdos/MSH

With the current largest generation of young people, there is much to celebrate on August 12, International Youth Day. In particular, there is the growing recognition that as agents of change, adolescents and young people and their organisations are essential stakeholders who contribute to inclusive, just, sustainable and peaceful societies. Crucially, advocates working on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and reproductive rights (RR) advance access for young people in meaningful ways. Continue reading “Top tips for advocates working on emergency contraception”

Emergency contraception is a simple part of post-rape care: Why is it not routinely provided?

By Melissa Garcia and Sarah Rich

Melissa Garcia is Senior Technical Officer for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception and Sarah Rich is Senior Program Officer at Women’s Refugee Commission. This post originally appeared on the blog for the Sexual Violence Research Initiative

Emergency contraception (EC) can reduce the risk of pregnancy after unprotected sex, including in cases of sexual violence. Global guidance is clear that EC should be offered to women and girls within 120 hours of sexual violence to prevent the traumatic consequences of pregnancy resulting from rape.

Yet women and girls who have experienced unprotected sex, including through sexual violence, do not routinely have access to EC. The global aid communities must work together to increase access to EC for sexual violence survivors around the world, including for women and girls who are the most marginalized, like those living in crisis-affected settings. A range of strategies can be implemented to improve access to EC. Further research is also needed to identify, evaluate, and invest in new and innovative solutions. Continue reading “Emergency contraception is a simple part of post-rape care: Why is it not routinely provided?”

Preventing pregnancy after sexual assault: Do women and girls have access to emergency contraception?

Sarah Rich is Senior Technical Advisor at the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, hosted by Management Sciences for Health.

Mapingure was raped and sought EC at a hospital. The provider told her that she needed a police report. But by the time she came back… she was told it was too late to assist her. She became pregnant as a result of the rape.

–Zimbabwe case from 2014, presented by Godfrey Dalitso Kangaude in “Country overviews of legal grounds/policies related to health, rape, and safe abortion,” April 2016

Emergency contraception (EC) can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, including in cases of rape. Global guidance on EC access for sexual assault survivors is clear: EC should be offered to women and girls within 120 hours of the assault to prevent the traumatic consequences of pregnancy resulting from rape. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) clinical and policy guidelines for sexual assault and clinical handbook  include strong recommendations to provide EC as part of comprehensive, woman-centered care. Continue reading “Preventing pregnancy after sexual assault: Do women and girls have access to emergency contraception?”