Advocacy strategies for advancing midwifery in Mexico

By Eliana Monteforte and Aishling Thurow

(Leer la versión de español aquí.)

Eliana Monteforte is a Senior Technical Advisor, and Aishling Thurow is a Project Support Associate at Management  Sciences for Health

Photo by Eliana Monteforte/ MSH

Midwives can be powerful advocates for change because, as frontline health workers, they know all too well the enormous challenges that threaten their ability to deliver high-quality care to every woman they see in their clinic or community.  Midwives understand the health care needs of women and newborns because they work to meet those needs every day. They see the gaps in their health care systems–in resources, staffing, facilities, and policies–because they continuously struggle to fill those gaps. And they speak the truth about their needs for training, support, and enabling policies–because this is the job to which they have dedicated their lives and livelihoods.

The Mexican government is receptive to strengthening the role of professional midwifery in the continuum of women’s health care, and midwives are ready to leverage this political will to advocate for their profession in their respective states. In February, the FCI Program of MSH, with support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, convened teams of midwifery providers from five Mexican states to develop advocacy strategies to advance state-level policies that enable midwives to provide high-quality, respectful care for women, adolescents, and newborns. Continue reading “Advocacy strategies for advancing midwifery in Mexico”

Midwives of Hidalgo

Videographer: Pablo Romo Alvarez

Professional midwives provide lifesaving care to women and newborns. The government of Hidalgo state, Mexico, has launched a comprehensive midwifery program that aims to improve maternal health outcomes while providing services to women along the continuum of care, from pre-pregnancy to delivery and the immediate postnatal period

With funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the FCI Program of MSH works with midwives and maternal health service providers to strengthen advocacy and build evidence for midwifery practice in six states in Mexico.

 

 

Scenes from Midwifery Training: Helping Mothers Survive

By Nongma Sawadogo and Alanna Savage

Nongma Sawadogo leads work on women’s and children’s health for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in Burkina Faso, and Alanna Savage is senior communications specialist for the FCI Program of MSH. 

Burkina Faso has unacceptably high national rates of maternal and newborn mortality, but health indicators are the poorest in the Sahel, North and East where many more women and children are dying from preventable causes due to poor quality of care.

With support from Johnson & Johnson and working closely with the Division of Family Health, the Ministry of Health, UNFPA, the School of Public Health and national midwifery associations, the FCI Program of MSH is leading an intensive training, supervision and mentorship program to improve midwives’ mastery of life-saving clinical skills. The training program covers three modules: (1) compassionate care for mothers and newborns, (2) Helping Mothers Survive, and (3) Helping Babies Breathe.

Continue reading “Scenes from Midwifery Training: Helping Mothers Survive”

Building Health Systems that Work for Mothers, Newborns and Midwives

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor, a former practicing midwife, is the Vice President of the Health Programs Group at Management Sciences for Health (MSH). This post originally appeared on MSH’s Global Health Impact Blog

A midwife leads a pregnancy club in eastern Uganda. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)

For many people living in poor and underserved regions – whether rural communities or growing cities – midwives are the health system. Continue reading “Building Health Systems that Work for Mothers, Newborns and Midwives”

Person-centered group antenatal care in Eastern Uganda: Reaching women through pregnancy clubs

By Shafia Rashid and Kate Ramsey

Shafia Rashid is a Principal Technical Advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Kate Ramsey is Senior Principal Technical Advisor for maternal and newborn health at MSH.

Women examine cards depicting health information during a pregnancy club session in eastern Uganda. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)

Improving the quality of care that women experience during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period has become a major global priority. Achieving good quality care requires not only clinical improvements, but also a person-centered approach that takes into account women’s and health workers’ needs and perspectives.

In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated its antenatal care guidelines, calling for a positive pregnancy experience through holistic, person-centered antenatal services that provide pregnant women with emotional support and advice in addition to the standard clinical assessments.

Group antenatal care, initially developed in the U.S. several decades ago, is a promising model that responds to women’s health and information concerns during pregnancy. Facilitated by a health provider, usually a nurse or midwife, group antenatal care offers a forum for pregnant women to learn more about their pregnancies, share their experiences, receive essential health and self-care information, and provide  social and emotional support to each other within the group. Health care providers meet individually with group participants after the group sessions  for routine physical and clinical care and to discuss any confidential issues. Group antenatal care can also benefit health care providers through increased job satisfaction without substantially increasing the amount of time required. Continue reading “Person-centered group antenatal care in Eastern Uganda: Reaching women through pregnancy clubs”

From fronteras to frontlines, Mexican midwives saving lives

Ariadna Capasso is senior technical advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH). This post originally appeared on the MSH Health Impact Blog

Over the past year, Tijuana, Mexico, has seen an influx of U.S.-bound Haitian migrants fleeing communities left in disrepair from the 2010 earthquake and further devastated by Hurricane Matthew in October 2016. These migrants often begin their journey in Latin America and trek through multiple countries and hostile terrain only to find they cannot enter the U.S. once at the border. Among the stalled Haitian migrants living in makeshift shelters as they contemplate their next steps, pregnant women face another uncertainty: whether they or their baby will languish during pregnancy and childbirth without access to skilled maternal and newborn health care.  Recognizing this health crisis, a group of midwives, Parteras Fronterizas (Borderland Midwives in English), arrived on the scene to provide antenatal and safe childbirth care, with help from women who translated from Spanish or English to Haitian Creole.

Parteras Fronterizas embodies the reason we celebrate the International Day of the Midwife–to honor the many midwives around the world who work on the frontlines to deliver high-quality, respectful care to women and newborns during pregnancy and childbirth. At the Third Regional Forum of the Mexican Midwifery Association in late April 2017, traditional and professional midwives, medical doctors, health managers, doulas and midwifery students gathered together to share midwifery practices and strategies for advancing the midwifery profession in Mexico.

Indigenous midwives’ centre, Chiapas, Mexico
Photo credit: Simon Chambers/PWRDF

Continue reading “From fronteras to frontlines, Mexican midwives saving lives”

Healthy Women, Healthy Nations

By Fatimata Kané

Fatimata Kané is Project Director of the FCI Program of MSH in Mali. This article originally appeared on the MSH Health Impact Blog. Read this article in French

Photo: Catherine Lalonde

Putting a child on the earth is a whole different type of work. Not everyone can guide a woman and her baby safely through pregnancy and childbirth.

I know what it means to keep women and babies alive and healthy because I am a midwife. Continue reading “Healthy Women, Healthy Nations”

Femmes saines, nations en santé

Par Fatimata Kané

Fatimata Kané est directrice  du programme FCI de MSH au Mali.

Photo: Catherine Lalonde

Mettre un enfant au monde est tout un travail différent. Tout le monde peut aider quelqu’un qui est malade, mais tout le monde ne peut pas faire le travail d’une sage-femme–guider une femme et son bébé en toute sécurité pendant la grossesse et l’accouchement. Je sais ce que signifie garder les femmes et les bébés vivants et en bonne santé parce que je suis une sage-femme. Continue reading “Femmes saines, nations en santé”

Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients

By Catharine Taylor

Catharine Taylor is Vice President for health programs at Management Sciences for Health. This post originally appeared on STAT News

Midwifery students in Sierra Leone, which has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. Funding for safe pregnancy and delivery worldwide is threatened by President Trump’s reinstatement of the global gag rule. (Photo by MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump’s reinstatement of the Mexico City Policy, better known as the global gag rule, came as no surprise to anyone working in the field of global health. We have been through this before — in 1984, when the policy was first put into effect by President Reagan, and then in 1993, 2001, and 2009, when it was repealed, reinstated, and repealed again.

The Mexico City Policy is called a gag rule because it limits not just what organizations and health providers do but what they are permitted to say. It prevents foreign organizations that receive US government funding from performing abortions — even if they are using funds from non-US government sources and even if abortion is completely legal in their countries.

The global gag rule also steps right between a woman and her doctor, nurse, or midwife, preventing these frontline health providers from telling their patients about the full, legal range of health options available to them. It forbids trusted advisers from giving honest, comprehensive health advice and information. I started my career as a nurse-midwife, and then worked in maternal and newborn health programs in Africa and Asia, so I know what this will mean for the lives and health of women and their families. Continue reading “Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients”

Keeping it real: Accountability for women’s, children’s, and adolescents’ health during the SDG era

“It’s important we ask women what’s actually happening on the ground. After all these strategies and initiatives, women are still giving birth on the floor. And they have to get their own water!” said Caroline Maposhere, a Zimbabwean nurse-midwife and civil society advocate, from the floor of the 5th Annual Breakfast for Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health, September 18.

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Caroline Maposhere shares her experience working as a midwife in Zimbabwe. (Photo by J. Cook Photography)

Continue reading “Keeping it real: Accountability for women’s, children’s, and adolescents’ health during the SDG era”