World Population Day 2018 highlights ineffective and unsafe pregnancy prevention behaviors and practices. What about emergency contraception?

By Melissa Garcia

Melissa Garcia is a Technical Advisor for the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, hosted by MSH. This article originally appeared on the ICEC website

For this year’s World Population Day on 11 July, our community celebrated and affirmed the right to family planning. On this day, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) also called attention to the many people around the world unable to realize this right.

The Guttmacher Institute’s analysis , Adding it Up, estimates that globally, 214 million women of reproductive age in developing regions want to avoid pregnancy but are not using a modern method of contraception. One hundred and fifty five million women are not using a contraceptive method. Some 59 million women use traditional practices and remedies for pregnancy prevention. UNFPA has listed some of these practices in this article and accompanying photo essay. They are cause for concern because the users of such “pseudo” contraceptive practices act in the belief that they are protecting themselves from the risk of unintended pregnancy. But in fact they are exposing themselves to that risk, and potentially to further health consequences.

This phenomenon affects emergency contraception (EC) as well. The majority of women are not aware that a contraceptive option after sex exists, in most countries that capture EC knowledge in their most recent Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data.  Most women have never heard of the dedicated, safe and effective pill, and copper- IUD regimens that are the only effective post-coital method. Continue reading “World Population Day 2018 highlights ineffective and unsafe pregnancy prevention behaviors and practices. What about emergency contraception?”

WE DECIDE: Young persons with disabilities call for equal rights and a life free of violence

Ariadna Capasso is Senior Technical Advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health.

Violence against women, including forced or coerced sex, is an epidemic that persists all over the world. But women with disabilities, often marginalized and denied their sexual and reproductive health rights, are particularly vulnerable to such abuse.

In June, UNFPA launched WE DECIDE, a global initiative to promote gender equality and social inclusion of young persons with disabilities and advocate for the end of sexual violence. The FCI Program of MSH worked with UNFPA and a broad range of partners in the field of disabilities to build consensus for the framework of the four-year initiative and to develop communications materials for the initiative, including a video and an infographic that conveys key messages and data on the status of persons with disabilities and gender-based violence.

Photo by the Spanish Cooperation (AECID)
An expert and advocate for persons with disabilities attends a strategy meeting to discuss the new WE DECIDE initiative. Photo by the Spanish Cooperation (AECID)

Continue reading “WE DECIDE: Young persons with disabilities call for equal rights and a life free of violence”

Delivering care, delivering change for women and babies: Latin American midwives build skills for country-level advocacy

Ariadna Capasso is senior technical advisor for the FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health.

We know how to prevent maternal and newborn deaths, but globally, almost 300,000 women and 3 million newborns continue to lose their lives because they lack access to high-quality obstetric services–services which midwives provide. Skilled midwives can prevent up to two-thirds of maternal and newborn deaths by ensuring a safe birth for both mother and baby and responding quickly when complications arise.

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Photo by Joey O’Loughlin

Midwives not only provide essential care, they also provide a powerful voice for policies and programs that advance access to affordable and high-quality health services. They understand the health needs of women and newborns, as they work to meet those needs everyday. And they experience, firsthand, the gaps in health systems, from human resources and infrastructure to regulations that limit their practice.

Continue reading “Delivering care, delivering change for women and babies: Latin American midwives build skills for country-level advocacy”